Homemade Dutch Oven Bread: Kneaded and No-Knead Methods

I’ve spent the last few days trying out lots of versions of Dutch Oven bread, and let me tell you, the results are tasty! I’ve got recipes for a kneaded Dutch oven bread, and one that requires no kneading at all. Both are very easy and could pass as a loaf from an artisan bakery with no problem. I also tried them with bread flour, all-purpose flour, and whole wheat flour. All in all, we enjoyed each of the loaves, but our favorite was the no-knead made with bread flour. I found that the texture of the bread on the no-knead method was lighter and less dense on the interior, while maintaining a perfectly crusty exterior which Hubby and I preferred. All you need now is a little olive oil and some herbs for dipping!

no knead Dutch oven bread, kneaded bread Dutch oven

Dutch Oven Bread (no Knead) (32)

Homemade Dutch Oven Bread: Kneaded Method

Total Time: 5 hours

Yield: 1 loaf

Homemade Dutch Oven Bread: Kneaded Method

Ingredients:

4 cups flour (All-purpose or bread flour work best. For whole wheat: use 2 cups all-pupose and 2 cups whole wheat flour)

1 teaspoon kosher salt

1 teaspoon active dry yeast

1 1/2 cups warm water

olive oil for coating crust, if desired

5-6 quart Dutch Oven with lid

Parchment paper

Directions:

  • In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook attachment, mix together the flour, salt, yeast, and water. Knead in mixer on medium speed for 10 minutes, until dough is smooth and elastic.
  • Cover bowl with plastic wrap or the lid of a pot and allow to rise for 2-4 hours until doubled in bulk.
  • Knead risen dough on a floured surface for a few minutes to remove air bubbles and to redistribute the yeast. Shape into a loose ball, set on a large piece of parchment paper, and cover with a towel for 10 minutes to allow gluten to relax.
  • Shape dough into a tight ball and lift the dough along with the parchment paper and place in the bottom of the Dutch Oven. Cover with the lid and allow to rise for an additional 30 minutes.
  • While dough finishes rising, preheat oven to 450 degrees.
  • Using a sharp knife, make two slits in the surface of the dough forming an "X" shape, and brush with olive oil and sprinkle with kosher salt (if desired, I prefer without.)
  • Bake, covered for 30 minutes in 450 degree oven. After 30 minutes, remove lid and lower heat to 375 degrees. Bake for 15 minutes longer, until bread is deep golden and sounds hollow when tapped.
  • Allow to cool on rack for 15 minutes before slicing.

Note: You do not need to oil the pot if you are baking on parchment paper. I have tried it without parchment paper, and instead oiled the pot, but found the bottom crust to be too dark/crunchy/oily for my taste. The texture was far superior when only parchment paper was used.

**Also, check to make sure the knob on the lid of your Dutch Oven is safe for use at 450 degrees. If you're not sure, just unscrew the knob during baking. (Metal knobs and handles are fine.There is one specific type of handle from Le Creuset that is not recommended at this high of heat. There is more info available on their website.

Adapted from lecreuset.com

Dutch Oven Bread (no Knead) (30)

Homemade Dutch Oven Bread: No-Knead Method

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 45 minutes

Total Time: 15 hours

Yield: 1 loaf

Homemade Dutch Oven Bread: No-Knead Method

Ingredients:

3 cups flour (Bread Flour is my preference, all-purpose works great too. For whole wheat: Use 1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour and 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour.)

1 teaspoon kosher salt

1 teaspoon active dry yeast

1 1/2 cups warm water

Parchment paper

5-6 quart Dutch Oven with lid

Large plastic bowl with lid (Rubbermaid or Tupperware-type)

Directions:

  • In a large plastic bowl that has a tight-fitting lid, whisk together the flour, salt, and yeast. Pour in the water and mix well with a wooden spoon. The dough will be very sticky and quite stringy-looking. Cover with lid and allow to rise for 12-18 hours. Overnight worked great for me.
  • Place Dutch oven with lid in the oven and preheat to 450 degrees F.
  • Scrape dough from the bowl onto a well-floured work surface. Shape into a ball, set on a large piece of parchment paper, and cover with a towel while oven preheats.
  • Once the Dutch oven has preheated, carefully remove it from the oven and gently lift the dough by the parchment paper and lower into the center of the bottom of the pot (without burning your hands!) Cut two slits in the surface of the dough,forming an "X".
  • Bake, covered, in the 450 degree oven for 30 minutes. After 30 minutes, remove lid and bake for 15 minutes more.
  • Remove loaf to a rack to cool for 15 minutes before slicing.

Adapted from www.justapinch.com

Dutch Oven Bread (Two Methods: Kneaded and No-knead)

 

*This post was shared on Tatertots & Jello’s Link Party Palooza.

 

Comments

  1. 1

    says

    These look fantastic! Now I really need to invest in a cast iron pot! I love making bread and make it every week in Aust. but I have to confess it is sooo cheap and delicious here that I just buy it fresh. I will save this for home though- beautiful!

    • 2

      says

      I can’t blame you for buying it fresh. Our options for fresh baked bread here are limited. The few great places are VERY expensive. I’m sure you would have as much fun with your cast iron pot as I do!

  2. 3

    FirstTimer says

    I purchased a cast iron dutch oven a couple of weeks ago and I just baked my first loaf of bread ever this morning using the no-knead recipe. So easy and the results are fantastic. I had expected things to not turn out so well the first time!

  3. 5

    FirstTimer says

    Hi, again. I’m on my third loaf now and I’m still mastering handling the dough. Do you have any hints about cutting the slits into the dough? No matter how sharp the knife, I can’t puncture the dough without pushing the ball all out of shape. I’ve also tried gentle “sawing” with a serrated knife with a little more success, but it looks more like an indentation than an actual cut.

    Thanks!

    • 6

      says

      I typically use the tip of a very sharp paring knife and it works really well. Razor blades are commonly used for scoring dough also. Using the tip/point of the blade seems to work best for me. I hope this helps! Sorry you’ve been having trouble.

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